Severe Mental Illness

 

As part of the Severe Mental Illness (SMI) research programme we are conducting research into the diagnosis and treatment of patients with psychiatric disorders that significantly impair their functioning. This is done through national ‘multi-centre research’. This research is designed and coordinated by another institution (usually an academic centre) and we undertake smaller research projects ourselves.

 

Main Objective

The main objective obviously is to gather more knowledge about these disorders. Additionally, employees are trained to use diagnostic methods and are also trained to use new forms of treatment enabling us to improve the quality of care.

 

Severe Mental Illness
The term Severe Mental Illness encompasses psychotic disorders (with schizophrenia being the most common) and also bipolar disorders (also known as manic-depressive disorder). These disorders occur respectively in approximately 0.5-1% and approximately 2% of the population which is relatively common. In general, these disorders represent the presence of long term vulnerability for the patients. For a large majority of these patients there may also be long term moderate to poor functioning and there are also complex problems that play a role in a number of other areas of their lives, for example in the areas of physical health, housing, social relationships, daily activities and finances, and they may also come into contact with the police. In addition to the aforementioned disorders, other disorders can also cause profound disturbances in peoples’ lives.